March 17-18, 2007 (Hoods)


Emery Martin (L) and Audrey Chan (R) participating in the March 17, 2007 Anti-war Protest in Hollywood, California. Photo credit: Doug Wichert

Protest Story (excerpt)

The political context is ripe for protest. However, a person is advised to have a good sense of irony before engaging in the time-honored act of taking to the streets to express public opinion when the institutionally sanctioned processes for channeling citizen unrest (e.g. voting) are dysfunctional at best. There are plenty who say that protest doesn’t work. We are living in too distracted a time. You are more likely to get stunned by a policeman with a “non-lethal” electroshock Taser gun than you are to change someone’s mind. And forget about the media. If the corporate-owned papers haven’t already fired their progressive journalists, they’re pressuring them to follow party line and deliberately trimming any stories that would ruffle feathers. But if protest really is dead, why is the Bush administration taking such pains to suppress it? {See Executive Order: Blocking Property of Certain Persons Who Threaten Stabilization Efforts in Iraq, signed by President George W. Bush on July 17, 2007.}

With these questions in mind, I gathered with classmates, teachers, and fellow artists at the March 17, 2007 anti-war protest in Hollywood, California to mark the 4th anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq. It was an unreasonably beautiful day on Hollywood Boulevard and the LAPD (Los Angeles Police Department) assigned to the protest were on bicycles—a sure sign of a calm and friendly proceeding ahead. I passed out about a dozen black hoods that I had sewn the evening before for a group of us to wear while marching. It was a silent gesture to acknowledge the dehumanizing process of arrest, detention, and torture of Iraqi citizens by American troops. In addition to putting hoods or bags over prisoners’ heads, sensory deprivation goggles and earmuffs are used, as well as zip ties to bind the wrists, and interlocking cuffs at the ankles to lead the blind, deaf, and mute prisoners in a line. (read more)


Photo credit: Curtis Winter


Photo credit: David Weldzius


Photo credit: Patrick Lee


Photo credit: Patrick Lee


Demonstrators stand in between mock coffins during an anti-war rally to mark the fourth anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq, in Hollywood, California March 17, 2007. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES) [from Los Angeles Independent Media Center]


Demonstrators stand in between mock coffins during an anti-war rally to mark the fourth anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq, in Hollywood, California March 17, 2007. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES) [from Los Angeles Independent Media Center]


Demonstrators stand in between mock coffins during an anti-war rally to mark the fourth anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq, in Hollywood, California March 17, 2007. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES) [from Los Angeles Independent Media Center]


Photo credit: Audrey Chan


Emery Martin interviewed by LA Times reporter, Charles Proctor. Photo credit: Elana Mann


Compare the LA Times’ online coverage of the protest on March 17 and 18, 2007:


March 17, 2007 (pdf)
- day of the protest


March 18, 2007 (pdf)
- one day after the protest